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Integrating Ecology and Environmental Ethics: Earth Stewardship in the Southern End of the Americas

Autores:

Rozzi, R., Armesto, J.J., Gutiérrez, J.R., Massardo, F., Likens, G.E., Anderson, C.B., Poole, A., Moses, K.P., Hargrove, E., Mansilla, A.O., Kennedy, J.H., Willson, M., Jax, K., Jones, C.G., Callicott,J.B., and Arroyo, M.T.K.

Resumen:

The South American temperate and sub-Antarctic forests cover the longest latitudinal range in the Southern Hemisphere and include the world's southernmost forests. However, until now, this unique biome has been absent from global ecosystem research and monitoring networks. Moreover, the latitudinal range of between 40 degrees (°) south (S) and 60° S constitutes a conspicuous gap in the International Long-Term Ecological Research (ILTER) and other international networks. We first identify 10 globally salient attributes of biological and cultural diversity in southwestern South America. We then present the nascent Chilean Long-Term Socio-Ecological Research (LTSER) network, which will incorporate a new biome into ILTER. Finally, we introduce the field environmental philosophy methodology, developed by the Chilean LTSER network to integrate ecological sciences and environmental ethics into graduate education and biocultural conservation. This approach broadens the prevailing economic spectrum of social dimensions considered by LTSER programs and helps foster bioculturally diverse forms of Earth stewardship.

Año: 2012

Palabras claves: conservation, temperate forests, sub-Antarctic ecoregion, long-term ecological research, field stations

Referencia APA: Rozzi, R., Armesto, J.J., Gutiérrez, J.R., Massardo, F., Likens, G.E., Anderson, C.B., Poole, A., Moses, K.P., Hargrove, E., Mansilla, A.O., Kennedy, J.H., Willson, M., Jax, K., Jones, C.G., Callicott,J.B., and Arroyo, M.T.K. (2012). Integrating Ecology and Environmental Ethics: Earth Stewardship in the Southern End of the Americas. Bioscience, 62(3), 226-236.

The ecology, distribution and conservation status of Myrcianthes coquimbensis : a globally endangered endemic shrub of the Chilean Coastal Desert

Autores:

García-Guzman, P., Loayza, A., Carvajal, D., Letelier, L., & Squeo, F.

Resumen:

The current distribution of M. coquimbensis extends along 82.8 km of the Chilean coast, where the species is mainly threatened by habitat loss. Only 13% of the individuals flowered during 2010, and 66% of these plants lost their entire flower crop due to desiccation. Few seeds (7.5%) were lost to post-dispersal seed predation. The populations are composed mainly of adult plants (70% of the individuals), and little to no recruitment was observed.

Año: 2012

Palabras claves: Atacama Desert, Chile, conservation biology, habitat loss, Myrtaceae, restricted-range species,

Referencia APA: García-Guzman, P., Loayza, A., Carvajal, D., Letelier, L., & Squeo, F. (2012). The ecology, distribution and conservation status of Myrcianthes coquimbensis: a globally endangered endemic shrub of the Chilean Coastal Desert. Plant Ecology & Diversity, 5(2), 197-204.

Progress in creating a joint research agenda that allows networked long-term socio-ecological research in southern South America: Addressing crucial technological and human capacity gaps limiting its application in Chile and Argentina.

Autores:

Anderson, C., Celis-Diez, J., Bond, B., Martínez Pastur, G., Little, C., & Armesto, J., Ghersa, C., Austin, A., Schlichter, T., Lara, A., Carmona, M., Chaneton, E.J., Gutierrez, J.R.,et al.

Resumen:

Since 1980, more than 40 countries have implemented long-term ecological research (LTER) programs, which have shown their power to affect advances in basic science to understand the natural world at meaningful temporal and spatial scales and also help link research with socially relevant outcomes. Recently, a disciplinary paradigmatic shift has integrated the human dimensions of ecosystems, leading to a long-term socio-ecological research (LTSER) framework to address the world's current environmental challenges. A global gap in LTER/LTSER only exists in the latitudinal range of 40–60°S, corresponding to Argentina and Chile's temperate/sub-Antarctic biome. A team of Chilean, Argentine and US researchers has participated in an ongoing dialogue to define not only conceptual, but also practical barriers limiting LTER/LTSER in southern South America. We have found a number of existing long-term research sites and platforms throughout the region, but at the same time it has been concluded an agenda is needed to create and implement further training courses for students, postdoctoral fellows and young scientists, particularly in the areas of data and information management systems. Since LTER/LTSER efforts in Chile and Argentina are incipient, instituting such courses now will enhance human and technical capacity of the natural science and resource community to improve the collection, storage, analysis and dissemination of information in emerging LTER/LTSER platforms. In turn, having this capacity, as well as the ongoing formalization of LTER/LTSER programs at national levels, will allow the enhancement of crucial collaborations and comparisons between long-term research programs within the region and between hemispheres and continents. For Spanish version of the entire article, see Online Supporting Information (Appendix S1).

Año: 2012

Palabras claves: environmental monitoring; information management; long-term ecological research; LTER; LTSER; science policy; socio-ecology

Referencia APA: Anderson, C., Celis-Diez, J., Bond, B., Martínez Pastur, G., Little, C., & Armesto, J., Ghersa, C., Austin, A., Schlichter, T., Lara, A., Carmona, M., Chaneton, E.J., Gutierrez, J.R., et al. (2012). Progress in creating a joint research agenda that allows networked long-term socio-ecological research in southern South America: Addressing crucial technological and human capacity gaps limiting its application in Chile and Argentina. Austral Ecology, 37(5), 529-536.